Federal Reserve

Federal Reserve
60 Dorrance St.
Providence, RI 02903
401-737-3783
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Photographer's comments:

The Federal Reserve is one of the most unique wedding reception sites in downtown Providence. The function hall was once a bank, and the owners, Bob and Ann Burke, took care to preserve all the original elements of the bank, including the double-door vault. The teller's station has been converted into a 60-foot marble bar. It's gilded high ceilings and ornate decorations prompted a newspaper critic to describe it once as an "unabashed luxury of appointments" that offered "ornament on a grand scale." The first floor is adorned by 20-foot-high windows, each decorated with a stained glass coat of arms that represent the people and institutions significant in the international banking world of the early 1900s: the Rothschilds, Alexander Hamilton, the Bank of Scotland, the Bank of Amsterdam. The floor is inlaid marble. The ceiling displays 50 gold-trimmed coffers and hundreds of plaster molded flowers and three solid-bronze chandeliers. A staircase leads to a second floor that overlooks the first floor. The unique character of the Federal Reserve gives many opportunies for nice pictures, both candids and portraits. The large windows let in lots of natural light, so a flash may not be necessary for daytime functions. The incandescent lights create a warm atmosphere at night.

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The main floor is shaped like the letter L.
The warm incandescent lights provide a nice atmosphere at night.
Owner Bob Burke explains how he will remove the cork from a champagne bottle with a sword.
Owner Bob Burke chops off the cork from a champagne bottle with a sword.
The small second floor has a balcony that overlooks the main gathering area.
Daylight filtering in through the stained-glass windows makes the Federal Reserve a unique reception site.
The tall windows provide beautiful natural light for candids and portraits. At left is a plaque marking the high-water mark reached during the 1938 hurricane that devastated downtown Providence.
LCD screens around the facility allow you to have an ongoing slideshow.